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Twenty-five ways in which MIT has transformed computing  2019-02-25
From digital circuits to ingestible robots, the Institute has helped spearhead key innovations in the technology revolution.
Neuroscientists reverse some behavioral symptoms of Williams Syndrome  2019-04-22
Mouse study yields insights into the rare condition, may shed light on other neurological disorders.
Custom carpentry with help from robots   2018-02-28
CSAIL’s robotic system minimizes dangerous sawing, helps users customize furniture.
Helping computers perceive human emotions  2018-07-24
Personalized machine-learning models capture subtle variations in facial expressions to better gauge how we feel.
Designing vehicles that drive, fly — and swim  2019-03-31
Senior and Marshall Scholar Crystal Winston pursues her vision of a world where cars aren’t limited to roads.
Robot hand is soft and strong  2019-03-15
Gripper device inspired by “origami magic ball” can grasp wide array of delicate and heavy objects.
“Blind” Cheetah 3 robot can climb stairs littered with obstacles  2018-07-05
Improved design may be used for exploring disaster zones and other dangerous or inaccessible environments.
Teleoperating robots with virtual reality  2017-10-11
A virtual reality system from the Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory could make it easier for factory workers to telecommute.
How we make complex decisions  2019-05-16
Neuroscientists identify a brain circuit that helps break decisions down into smaller pieces.
 

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Anticipatory Cognitive Science is a research field that ensembles artificial intelligence, biology, psychology, neurology, engineering and philosophy in order to build anticipatory cognitive systems that are able to face human tasks with the same anticipatory capabilities and performance. In deep: Cognitive science is the interdisciplinary study of mind and intelligence, embracing philosophy, psychology, artificial intelligence, neuroscience, linguistics, and anthropology. Its intellectual origins are in the mid-1950s when researchers in several fields began to develop theories of mind based on complex representations and computational procedures. Its organizational origins are in the mid-1970s when the Cognitive Science Society was formed and the journal Cognitive Science began. Since then, more than sixty universities in North America, Europe, Asia, and Australia have established cognitive science programs, and many others have instituted courses in cognitive science.