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Yo-yo champion pursues his passions at MIT  2018-09-07
Alex Hattori, a senior in MechE and six-time national yo-yo champion, explores yo-yos and robotics inside and out of the classroom.
Brain activity pattern may be early sign of schizophrenia  2018-11-08
In a study that might enable earlier diagnosis, neuroscientists find abnormal brain connections that can predict onset of psychotic episodes.
Mark Harnett named Vallee Foundation Scholar  2018-09-14
MIT neuroscientist is among five people selected to receive the early career award.
Network of diverse noncoding RNAs acts in the brain  2018-06-07
Scientists identify the first known network consisting of three types of regulatory RNAs.
Ann Graybiel wins 2018 Gruber Neuroscience Prize  2018-05-16
MIT neuroscientist is recognized for her pioneering work on the complexity and function of the basal ganglia.
Testing new drugs with “ALS-on-a-chip”   2018-10-10
3-D tissue model replicates the motor neuron connections affected by amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.
Robot learns to follow orders like Alexa  2017-08-30
ComText, from the Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory, allows robots to understand contextual commands.
Making driverless cars change lanes more like human drivers do  2018-05-23
Algorithm computes “buffer zones” around autonomous vehicles and reassess them on the fly.
Helping computers perceive human emotions  2018-07-24
Personalized machine-learning models capture subtle variations in facial expressions to better gauge how we feel.
 

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Anticipatory Cognitive Science is a research field that ensembles artificial intelligence, biology, psychology, neurology, engineering and philosophy in order to build anticipatory cognitive systems that are able to face human tasks with the same anticipatory capabilities and performance. In deep: Cognitive science is the interdisciplinary study of mind and intelligence, embracing philosophy, psychology, artificial intelligence, neuroscience, linguistics, and anthropology. Its intellectual origins are in the mid-1950s when researchers in several fields began to develop theories of mind based on complex representations and computational procedures. Its organizational origins are in the mid-1970s when the Cognitive Science Society was formed and the journal Cognitive Science began. Since then, more than sixty universities in North America, Europe, Asia, and Australia have established cognitive science programs, and many others have instituted courses in cognitive science.